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Women's Health Week


Posted: 5/10/2018
Women's Health Week

Women's Health Week is a week celebrated each year, starting on Mother's Day, that helps to empower women to make their health a priority and take steps to improve their health.

 

Here are some steps women can take for better health:

  • Visit a doctor or nurse for a well-woman visit (checkup) and preventive screenings
    • Remember to discuss things such as: whether you are planning to have kids in the next year, tobacco/alcohol use, if there is any violence in your life, and family history of mental health conditions or cancer 
  • Get active - strive for 30 minutes of moderate activity most days of the week
  • Eat healthy - try to eat a balanced diet including fruits, vegetables, fiber, and calcium
  • Pay attention to mental health, including getting enough sleep (7-8 hours per night) and managing stress
  • Avoid unhealthy behaviors, such as smoking, texting while driving, and not wearing a seatbelt or bicycle helmet

 

Why is it important to stay active?

  • Women of any age who get enough physical activity/exercise can lower their risk of heart disease and cancer
  • You need about 2.5 hours of moderate intensity physical activity a week 
    • This breaks down to about 30 minutes a day
  • Moderate intensity activity includes: walking, biking, tennis, general gardening, and water aerobics
  • Only about 48.1% of women aged 18 and over met the 2008 federal physical activity 

 

Obesity in Women:

  • Two out of every three women in the United States are overweight or obese
  • Women with a BMI of 25 to 29.9 are considered overweight while women with a BMI of 30 or more have obesity. Calculate your BMI here.
  • Extra weight leads to many diseases that affect women, such as heart disease, diabetes, and many cancers
  • The best way to lose the extra weight is by starting with your diet.  The number of calories you need each day depends on many things, including your age, level of physical activity, height, and weight.
  • The American Cancer Society has provided a free tool to calculate the amount of calories you need in a day. Click here to calculate calories.

 

For more information, please visit:
https://www.womenshealth.gov/nwhw
https://www.cdc.gov/women/podcasts/index.htm

 

 

 


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